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From Boobs-on-ice to Boob-so-nice to Tricia and Theresia


I was reading the twitter on “boobs on ice blog” that could also be read as “boob so nice blog,” then somehow I found myself was in another blog reading Tricia’s story. I don’t have time to elaborate, but if you’ve landed at this page accidentally or even for some other crazy reasons, please just click the link above and read the story of Tricia, and spread the words about the link.

As you can see, I don’t even know who Tricia was, since I just found her story after reading the twitter of Susan Reynolds. But this introduction in her page will give you some idea why did it catch my attention:

My Story, My Family, My Friends

I’m Tricia. On March 20, 2008, I was diagnosed with an aggressive form of breast cancer called invasive lobular carcinoma. Quite the shocker.

On March 29, I had a bilateral mastectomy and will soon begin a comprehensive and overwhelming menu of treatments, including chemotherapy and possibly hormonal therapy.

With this website you can follow me on my journey through recovery and renewal. Thanks for stopping by.

The bad part of course was the unfortunate situation she was in, where she was diagnosed with an aggresive breast cancer; the good part was, while it’s just happened very recently, she has already received the initial treatment in no time. Isn’t that wonderful?

I feel so happy for Tricia and all other patients here in the U.S., since the treatment is readily available. Prior to checking my twitter, I’ve just received a forwarded message about the latest status of baby Theresia with an enlarging head that I posted few days ago. She was from a little town in Flores, Indonesia, and they are still struggling to find another 8.5 million Indonesian Rupiah, since after the local paper published her story (which was the source of my posting), they could only collected 16.5 million Indonesian rupiah (IDR), up from 12 million IDR reported in my posting, but 8.5 million short than the 25 million IDR needed. With that amount, it would allow her family to take her to a bigger hospital in Surabaya in East Jawa, Indonesia. [It’s some 4-5 hours flight from the capital of province – Kupang (my old hometown), in addition to some 2-hour flight or two three days by a ferry boat from her hometown to Kupang.] With current exchange rate, what they really need is less than $925. I’m too busy right now to go out and soliciting this amount from my friends in town or requesting online donation. But if you’re reading this post and you happen to know any organization that could help this little baby, then please post your comment here and I’m sure that someone working for Theresia’s cause will contact you. But again, please don’t forget to visit boob so nice and Tricia’s site, particularly on how you can help on Tricia’s page. I twitted Susan Reynold telling her that I’d prefer they could finally find the cure of cancer rather then letting women with breast cancer going through the boobs on ice procedure, even though it could be read as boob so nice. And for you, even if you could not do anything, please don’t forget to pray for all the women with breast cancer, particularly Susan and Tricia that just went thru the treatment, and also for Theresia. Funny, isn’t that Tricia and Theresia sound so close? Just notice this at the end so I’ve added their names to the title.

{ 5 comments… add one }
  • Kusnady Dharmawan April 1, 2008, 12:32 am

    Dear Aris, such cases are common around here. It’s known as hydrocephalus. People who suffered from hydrocephalus are not able to be cured. Rotary have helped them around Semarang city, but Kupang is very far away from our reach. How about the Singaporean pilot who joined Rotary? I talked with him 2 weeks ago by phone .

  • drt April 1, 2008, 6:53 am

    Dear Kus, thanks for the info about hydrocephalus. The latest news I heard Captain Budi is in Kupang, but I’m not sure if he is aware about this story or not.
    As far as Rotary Club, I know they do have one in Kupang, as you may read from this posting of Captain Budi. You may also see the picture of Captain Budi with Mr. Fulbertus Guido of the Rotary Club of Kupang. Since in the article, they mentioned about the join effort between Rotary Singapore and Rotary Kupang, I just wonder, is there any possibility of a join cooperation between Rotary Semarang or even Rotary Surabaya for example with Rotary Kupang to help this baby Theresia? This is just a thought, but hopefully someone from Pos Kupang also read this message and try to search for the option. Once again, thank you very much Kus.

  • drt April 1, 2008, 7:00 am

    Reading Kus’s comment made me wonder so I went to check the wiki and here is part of the info I found there:

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Hydrocephalus

    Hydrocephalus (pronunciation IPA: /ˌhaɪˌdɹoʊˈsɛfələs/) is a term derived from the Greek words “hydro” meaning water, and “cephalus” meaning head, and this condition is sometimes known as “water in the brain”. People with this condition have abnormal accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the ventricles, or cavities, of the brain. This may cause increased intracranial pressure inside the skull and progressive enlargement of the head, convulsion, and mental disability.

    Hydrocephalus is usually due to blockage of CSF outflow in the ventricles or in the subarachnoid space over the brain. In a normal healthy person, CSF continuously circulates through the brain and its ventricles and the spinal cord and is continuously drained away into the circulatory system. In a hydrocephalic situation, the fluid accumulates in the ventricles, and the skull may become enlarged because of the great volume of fluid pressing against the brain and skull. Alternatively, the condition may result from an overproduction of the CSF fluid, from a congenital malformation blocking normal drainage of the fluid, or from complications of head injuries or infections.[1]

    Infants and young children with hydrocephalus typically have abnormally large heads, because the pressure of the fluid causes the individual skull bones — which have yet to fuse — to bulge outward at their juncture points. Compression of the brain by the accumulating fluid eventually may cause convulsions and mental retardation. Hydrocephalus occurs in about one out of every 500 live births[2] and was routinely fatal until surgical techniques for shunting the excess fluid out of the central nervous system and into the blood or abdomen were developed.

    Usually, hydrocephalus need not cause any intellectual impairment if recognized and properly treated. A massive degree of hydrocephalus rarely exists in normally functioning people, though such a rarity may occur if onset is gradual rather than sudden.[3] ….read more

  • drt April 1, 2008, 10:40 am

    Just received the pictures of Theresia from Dion db Putra of Pos Kupang via Elcid Li, but I don’t think it would be appropriate to let my visitors going through these heart-breaking pictures. God bless her family. I hope Pos Kupang could follow up with Rotary Club Kupang Office.

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